Saguaro National Park

Arizona Highways (and byways) – November 2019

I have to admit to feeling some trepidation as we embarked on our journey to Arizona. There are so many reports of Canadians being stopped at the US border; we can’t totally avoid a news-stream dominated by reports of US mass shootings, of political and racial tensions.

One of the best things about travel is that it forces us to move outside our accustomed ‘box’. It was challenging to realize that I am affected by that distorted media stream, to some extent buying into what is just another shading of demonization and prejudice. It was a delight to be reminded how charming and friendly I find all but a tiny minority of Americans and to remember what a beautiful, varied and interesting country the USA is. I still get a warm feeling thinking about the joyful singing of and interaction with the African American who was responsible for our breakfast in Watertown, having got up at 4:30 am to prepare and serve a much better than average hotel buffet.

Our travels were rich in new experiences, from desert landscapes to pit BBQ. What follows is largely drawn from my Facebook entries, effectively journaling our 2019 Arizona trip.

Note: Click into the images to scroll through at full size

November 5 – Travelling

A short drive across the border to Watertown, 45 minute flight to Philadelphia, then on to Phoenix, Arizona, arriving in time to have supper with Paul’s business partner, Jeremy, having quickly dropped off our luggage at our delightful Airbnb studio. We are staying in what was the garage of a house previously owned by Arizona’s first female governor, Rose Mofford.

November 6 – Phoenix

Business in the morning!

Then an awesome afternoon at the Heard Museum (don’t miss this, if you are in Phoenix!), with a leisurely walk ‘home’ through the lovely Encanto-Palmcroft historic district.

November 7 – Phoenix

Desert beauty and pit BBQ (Little Miss, considered among the best in the USA) – both somewhat alien to us northerners. Too much food in the last 48 hours as Jeremy has tried to expose us to some of the delicious quirks of the Phoenix food scene we’d have been unlikely to find on our own.

The Desert Botanical Gardens were a great introduction before we head out into Arizona’s desert lands tomorrow.

In Phoenix we have been fed to within an inch of our lives, culminating last night in what is known as THE Mexican restaurant to take out-of-towners to, Barrio Cafe. The food was amazing and the street art outside really cool, not to mention great company with our ‘business family’.

November 8 – Phoenix to Bisbee

Saguaros and petroglyphs (Saguaro National Park); magical glass, the historic Hotel Congress in Tucson where John Dillinger was captured, desert skies, ending the day in one of America’s quirkiest and best small historic towns, Bisbee.

As a bonus, there is a music festival, so we arrived to live music and cocktails in the back yard of our vintage motel!

November 9 – Bisbee to Globe

Bisbee
Bisbee

From Bisbee to the wild west of the brothers Earp, Doc Holliday, Big Nose Kate and Sadie Marcus (Tombstone) – The Birdcage Theatre offered one of the more authentic glimpses or Tombstone’s heyday.

Then on to the Salado Pueblo at Besh-Ba-Gowah, the treasure trove of the Pickle Barrel Trading Post and a wonderfully quirky classroom bedroom at the Noftsger Hill Inn in mining town, Globe.

It had to be the biggest B&B bedroom ever at the old school house in Globe, now the Noftsger Hill Inn! There was also a neat link to where we stayed in Phoenix, a home that had been owned by Rose Mofford, first female governor of Arizona. Rose was born in Globe, went to school here, and gave many materials from her time in office to the owners.

Noftsger Hill Inn
Noftsger Hill Inn
Noftsger Hill Inn

We thoroughly enjoyed exploring the Pickle Barrel Trading Post, though it was somewhat overwhelming.

Somewhat unexpectedly in this old mining town, we rounded off the day with a delicious Asian fusion meal at Bloom.

November 10 – Globe to Sedona

Montezuma Castle’s Sinagua cliff dwellings gave us a sense of a different type of Pueblo – the area had a lovely feel to me.

Montezuma Castle - Information Board

Not too long after, we got our first glimpse of Sedona‘s awe inspiring red rocks.

Approaching Sedona

Our home for the next few nights, the Red Rock Hiking Studio, is in an older part of town that was settled by the Haight-Ashbury generation, away from the tourist bustle and with a fabulous view from the end of the driveway. The evening’s bonus was the sighting of a Javelina (wild pig) as we drove in after supper.

November 11 – Sedona

Awe, wonder, beauty both natural and artistic; the Chapel of the Holy Cross, a chapel that rises out of the rock (in which Frank Lloyd Wright had a hand) and Mother Earth’s ‘Cathedral Rock’ (from so many different directions, including the gorgeous tranquility of Crescent Moon Ranch and coloured by the day’s changing light). Although the core of Sedona is shot through with bustle and commodification (the galleries were interesting in a way, but overwhelming), the red rocks have a genuinely peaceful quality, even looking out over a glorious Vista over lunch from the Creekside Bistro at the heart of downtown, though even more so sitting surrounded by the glory and soaking it up!

November 12 – Sedona

Gina on the Chimney Rock Trail, Sedona
Gina on the Chimney Rock Trail, Sedona

Feeling reasonably proud of myself; we’ve covered 8.5 km today in two separate hikes – and for probably the first time since back issues cut in in my early thirties, I walked with a backpack! We set out round Chimney Rock from our door at 7:20 am, getting to the Amitabha Stupa and Peace Park at the other end of the trail a little after 9 am – almost a sense of arriving as a pilgrim from the hills, rather lovely.

The Chimney Rock Trail loop is a lovely and relatively easy 3.5km hike, with fabulous views.

After a short break, we set out again a little further round the same range of rock up Soldiers’ Pass via the Devil’s Kitchen Sinkhole to the Seven Sacred Pools (as the monsoon was somewhat lacking this year, we only counted 6 with water!).

Elote Cafe, Chef Jeff Smedstad’s much acclaimed gourmet Mexican restaurant, is something of a foodie ‘must do’ in Sedona and was our choice to cap off our stay. I couldn’t resist buying a copy of the Elote Cookbook, duly signed at our table by the chef, along with a properly bound menu from the night of our visit (included with the book).

November 13 – Sedona to Phoenix via Jerome

I’ll be honest, road tripping had rather caught up with me by this point. As a result, I probably didn’t really appreciate our last stop, the historic copper mining town of Jerome, as much as I might have!

And the journey back to Phoenix was something of a trial – a residual effect of concussion, too long on the road still messes with my head.

November 14/15 – the return to ice and snow

What a difference a day makes… More than 30C between Phoenix and Seeley’s Bay. This is the first time we’ve missed first snowfall and the icing of our bay – even the first snow-clearance of our driveway! Our wetland looks promising for skating this year if we don’t get too much snow.

Arriving home to snow!
Arriving home to snow!

You can view our full Arizona album on Google Photos and follow our journey on Google Maps.

(Due to the intervention of Christmas 2019, family issues and then Covid, my half finished post was put on the back burner and forgotten about! But this was a great adventure and worth recording. So, finally, the post is finished. June 2021)

Garden Evolution (2021)

It is my intention to add in updates and, in particular, progress photos over time so as to capture the garden evolution progress!


The last few weeks have been a whirlwind of ‘garden evolution’ activity. In Ontario, so often a heatwave follows rapidly on the heels of the last frost, making garden clearance and planting tricky. This year has been no exception, with the last few days at above 30C (86F) not much more than a week after the final frost. Thankfully we are back to the low 20s now, better for working and for the plants.

We’ve managed to plant four more native trees, six native shrubs and a number of perennials as well as starting my Three Sisters planting as is supposed to be traditional with the corn seeds going into the ground three days before the May full moon! Most of this year’s vegetables are now planted. Hopefully they will survive the run of three cooler nights (down to 6C) later this week.

Rockery

Rockery May 2021

Beginning to overflow in abundance. . . the rockery at the front of the house. As I have learned more about native plants and the impact of invasive species, it is irksome and somewhat overwhelming to spot non-native invaders, undoubtedly planted in good faith and often recommended, that really should be removed; Bugleweed(Ajuga reptans), Red Deadnettle (Lamium pupureum) and more. On the plus side, there are many natives forming part of this cascade, including Prairie Smoke (Geum triflorum), which I love and seemed to have lost over the winter; native geraniums, Spiderwort (Tradescantia), Echinacea, Mountain Mint, and Asters. There are also native cultivars like Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spectabilis) and Aquilegia variants. As well as the Prairie Smoke, I added Field Pussytoes (Antennaria nglecta) and Winecup (Callirhoe involucrata).

Native Perennials

Newly planted native perennials May 2021

This bed, new for this year, is primarily a cutting bed but also a place to try out native perennials to guide later plantings, not to mention a pollinator patch. Most of these plants are pink, purple, blue or white.

Cutting & asparagus bed May 2021

The Perennials bed flanks our asparagus bed, now in its third year, which has another cutting bed on the other side. This is currently a mish mash based on seeds I could get at the last minute last year! Next year I hope to fill this with more native perennials, probably focusing on the reds and golds. A few other perennials were slotted into gaps, notably Turtle Head (Chelone glabra), Blanket Flower ( Gaillardia aristata) and Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis), which I love not least for its ability to attract hummingbirds.

Reducing Grassed Areas

Another project we have begun to address is reducing the amount of our property kept mown. We are trying to do this in a way that is mindful of keeping walking and working space as free from ticks as possible. Where we need to keep an area cut, we are trying to interplant with clover and to oversow with slow growing, drought tolerant seed (Eco-Lawn).

One of the first things we are tackling is underplanting some of our trees. This has the additional advantage of removing some of the ‘awkward to mow’ areas. I hope we will manage to do this without too much damage to the trees!

We have started with just a couple of trees this year. One is underplanted with Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica), Yellow Wood Poppies (Stylophorum diphyllum) and ferns. The other has various Spring favourites from other areas of our garden.  I moved ferns, violets, False Solomon’s Seal, Canada Anemone and Canadian Wild Ginger, even a Trillium around the tree but have just seeded the rest with commercial wildflower seeds for this summer before planting more thoughtfully in the Fall or next Spring.

Over time, we also plan to add in swathes of wildflowers, cut through with mown paths. We will need to ensure that we smother existing growth where we want to do this, so it will take time. The cutting beds will help us decide on the planting for these areas.

Trees and Shrubs

We started our tree planting for this year with five white pines for succession planting in our pine grove.

Last weekend we added four more native trees and three plants each of two native shrubs.

Looking into the wood towards the Black Cherry Tree

We planted Black Cherry (Prunus serotina) in the clearing created by the beavers. It can grow to 60 ft at up to 3 ft per year and hopefully will give a blossom highlight in Spring and lots of fruit for wildlife.

Serviceberry
Position of Serviceberry at the edge of the Pine Grove, where we have also planted five saplings for succession

Serviceberry (Amelanchier Laevis), a big favourite of mine, went in at the edge of our Pine Grove, a small tree with lovely blossom and berries. In Toronto the racoons tended to vandalised our Serviceberry for its fruit!

Pussy Willow

We already have Weeping Willows (not native, but I love them) and Bebb’s Willow, but I finally have the Pussy Willow (Salix discolor) I always wanted.

Spicebush
Hopefully the Spicebush will form a wall of yellow in Spring in front of the cedars.

Backing the edge of our pond we added three Spicebush (Lindera benzoin) that will hopefully form a wall of yellow blossom in the Spring (and more berries for wildlife if we’ve successfully managed to get both male and female plants).

Winterberry

The other new shrub is Winterberry (Ilex verticillata), our native Holly, not really like European Hollies. It does have red berries though (again assuming we have male and female plants).

Mountain Ash

I always understood that traditionally Holly should be paired with Rowan for protection against malevolent beings. So, on the other side of the driveway, there is a Mountain Ash (Sorbus americana). It’s another tree I’ve always loved.

Vegetable Bed to Kitchen Garden!

How did we come to expand from a vegetable bed to a kitchen garden?!

Original Vegetable bed and Hugelkultur bed

This was the original vegetable bed! To the right you can see the Hugelkultur bed we added last year. This year’s plantings include: zucchini, bush beans, broad beans, snow peas, lettuce, radishes, eggplant, cantaloupe, baby watermelon, spaghetti squash, delicata squash, peppers and herbs various.

New caged kitchen garden

We added more raised beds two or three years ago. These were fenced in last Fall and now have additional beds at either end, as well as built in planters outside at the front. Sunflowers to the fore, onions, chard tomatoes, a Three Sister mound (corn, pole beans, squash), cucumbers, more pole beans, with calendula, marigolds and nasturtiums outside in the front planters.

Inside the cage

Inside the cage . . . The makings of an irrigation system have just arrived! There is getting to be too much watering to do it by hand, plus it is wasteful.

Rhubarb bed

This, along with the asparagus bed, is really Paul’s domain. First and foremost it is the rapidly expanding rhubarb bed. This year there are also onions and a fallow area where we are trying to choke out the weeds with black plastic and mulch.

Lettuce as decoration on our patio step

I finally seem to have cracked growing lettuce and arugula! These pots just got brought up from the vegetable garden, with the next just started. Sooo good! To the right is our main herb patch – lemon balm, two kinds of oregano, sage, chives, two kinds of mint, two kinds of rosemary, thyme, with basils various and cilantro in pots.

Asparagus rhubarb and lettuce have all done well and are being much enjoyed. Let’s hope most of the other vegetables do as well.

Cottage time!

It’s a bit like having a magic portal when ‘going to the cottage’ requires no packing or travel, just a determination and discipline to embrace our home as we would a rental and ‘not do’!

A dear UK friend asked us what made us think to do this but, in truth, I know few people who live in this amazing area we call our home who regularly choose to go away during the summer. Instead, we head for the water and move lazily from hammock to gazebo or fire pit!

We kayaked on Loughborough Lake, a 20-minute drive to the dock at Battersea; at times it felt almost like wilderness and at others what we term rural suburbia but always beautiful, blessed by loons and herons and so quiet! It was lucky that Paul snapped his paddle before we set out and even luckier to be able to get a new one just 12 minutes’ drive away.

We explored the south end of Dog Lake in our underpowered metal tub, Tin Lizzie, running out of fuel just at the tip of Carrying Place – we paddled over to a neighbour who kindly ran us up the road to fetch the extra fuel.

These minor adventures are the true stuff of Canadian cottage time!

The 'Cottage'
The ‘Cottage’

We learned more about the origins and build of our house over a cream tea here with the original owners and about the past and renovation of the beautiful Arts and Crafts home on Beaupre Island, truly a piece of living history.

The house on Beaupre Island
The house on Beaupre Island

We ate out a couple of times (at the Holiday Country Manor and the Opinicon Pub – both in local villages), just enough to feel we were ‘away’, with simple cottage BBQs and salads the rest of the time.

And we were blessed with 10 days of probably the best weather this summer so far – golden and hot without being suffocating.

Mostly what stays with me is time to just sit and soak up the sights and sounds, the delight of being distracted from my book by the whirring wings and peeping of the hummingbirds and the orange flashes of the Monarch butterflies, and the sense quiet companionship – with Paul and with all that is.

Hummingbird

It was so tempting just to ‘stay at the cottage’ . . .

Abundance of life – an invitation to wonder, joy and gratitude

One of the great joys in living where we do is the abundance of life around us. Each day we bear witness to these other lives, the small (and not so small) birds and animals that inhabit and visit our land. I have, on at least one occasion, counted as many as sixteen different species visible at a time.

The squirrels and chipmunks are ubiquitous. Some of our neighbours experience them only as pests and it is true that they can be. We lost a couple of cushions to them last winter. They also have a reputation for getting into motorized equipment and trashing the wiring. And the black bomber spent much of the latter part of the summer pelting us with acorn laden twigs. But I remind myself that this is their land as much as it is ours. I can’t help being aware that mankind is notoriously the most destructive animal on the planet. 

I am awed by our squirrels’ ability to overcome challenges. We have tried at least to limit their access to our bird-feeders, which hang as a smorgasbord on a wire line between trees. Last winter there was little ingress – we seemed to have lost the wily old guard. But this summer there is a new generation of athletes. One black squirrel in particular has an extraordinary ability to jump both up from the ground and out from the trunk of a tree, covering distances equivalent to at least five times his own height. And there are a number of  tightrope walkers – I am fascinated by their seeming ability to eat and swallow when hanging upside down.

Every day, there is some unexpected presence. Every time I open a window or step outside, I am aware of what I think of as ‘the noisy silence’. Every day, there is an invitation to wonder, joy and gratitude.

See our Carrying Place Wildlife Photo Album for lots of photos!

Nature, connection and homecoming

Our first year of living in rural Ontario has been truly special. I have had a sense of homecoming, of re-connecting more fully with nature. And, for me, that connection is the source of much wonder and joy.

Cranberry Lake in Fall

So I put together a book, A year in the life of The House at Turtle Pond. A kind of journal, it seeks to capture our response to the newness of living through the turning of this first year, looking out over Cranberry Lake on the Rideau system in Southern Ontario, Canada.

It speaks to a deep connection with nature, the rhythm of the seasons and the interconnectedness of internal and external realities.

I wrote it first and foremost so as not to lose sight of the newness as the years pass and familiarity potentially dulls our awareness. But it has been lovely to find that at least a few people find in it something to feed the soul. It makes it even more worthwhile!

The book

Below is a link to A year in the life of The House at Turtle Pond as it appears on the Blurb website. Here you can glance through a preview. If you happen to be interested in having a copy and live locally, please feel free to contact me direct. Blurb often offers discounts to the creator of a book, which makes it significantly more affordable.

A year in the life of the house at Turtle Pond
A year in the …
By Gina Bearne
Photo book

By the way, it was our predecessors who named our wetland between the house and road Turtle Pond. And our neighbour noted that this was therefore The House at Turtle Pond,  like The House at Pooh CornerThis seemed apt, especially when I came across this:

And by and by Christopher Robin came to the end of things, and he was silent, and he sat there, looking out over the world, just wishing it wouldn’t stop.

A.A. Milne

(Originally posted on my other blog, Passage to Joy, but so much a part of our Canadian journey that I wanted to include it here!)